Personal, Pregnancy

20 Weeks!

It’s absolutely nuts to think we are officially halfway through this pregnancy! I can’t necessarily say it’s flown by, since the first trimester felt like an endless drag of illness and survival mode. But I’m definitely not ready for the next 20 weeks to fly by either!

We still have so much to do. We are moving at the end of March, so the nursery can’t be started. We won’t know the gender until our reveal on Saturday, so we haven’t really bought much for baby. I feel like I still have a million books to read and a ton of learning to do before baby arrives. Not sure 20 weeks will be enough time…. But also, not sure I’ll ever be fully “ready” for such a big, new thing.

We are 7 weeks into the second trimester and I can tell you, the promises of the second trimester being the best are true. I feel great. I am still exercising (just swimming and walking for joints and labor prep). I have gained back the weight I lost with pneumonia and morning sickness and am the heaviest I’ve ever been – in the best way! For having a joint disorder, I’m doing pretty well keeping my dislocations and joint slips to a minimum. And my favorite perk yet – I can finally call myself a morning person! I have always been one to sleep heavy and deep; anywhere, any time. On weekends my husband and I would sleep til about 1 PM. I think baby is trying to prepare me for when he/she arrives, because I’ve been waking up early (around 5 AM) and getting a jumpstart to my day, which I’ve never been able to do. Rachel Hollis, author of Girl Wash Your Face and Girl Stop Apologizing, often talks about the benefits of getting up early and jumping into the day. I finally see what she’s talking about! There’s something spectacular about giving yourself time to fully wake up, sip coffee, scroll instagram, read a magazine – write a blog post 😉 – get a headstart on your work for the day, do a little more with your hair and makeup sometimes. It helps me feel like I’m maintaining a little more control over my life in this moment of a lot of big new things coming at us. In addition to all the positives, I am feeling a little more difficulty with bending over, walking long periods and getting fatigued more easily.

One of the highlights of the past week I can’t fail to mention, is I am finally feeling baby move! I found out I have an anterior placenta (where the placenta is between baby and the front of your stomach instead of back towards the spine) which makes it more difficult to feel baby early on. Typically, they say you will feel baby move between 18-25 weeks, later if it’s your first. I felt baby move during the 19th week – and it wasn’t like anyone described. People and literature tell you it will feel like tiny gas bubbles or flutters. My first movement I felt was a massive somersault or flip that about knocked me out of my work chair. Since then, though, it HAS been a lot of flutters, bumps and kicks! After waiting month to month to check on baby with a heart doppler, it’s so nice to have reassurance throughout the day that baby is good and moving in there.

We had our 20 week ultrasound yesterday – and let me tell you – my bump best friend was right. It was absolutely mind-blowing! For those who don’t know, for a normal pregnancy, you typically have an ultrasound around 8-10 weeks, and then await for another at 20 weeks which is the full anatomy scan. They look at all the little details of baby, including the lips, the fingers, the bones, the sex. Then they measure all the parts of baby. The 20 week is important if you skip genetic testing because they can see any deformities or complications with baby. They can see where your placenta is, check the placental insertion, see how baby is turned (which doesn’t really matter this early). Luckily, baby was looking great and our technician was able to see what the gender was, even with our baby moving around like CRAZY. I do have to go back to get more images of baby’s head, because baby’s head was so low and we couldn’t get he/she to move the head for different angles (even with jumping jacks!). It is mind-blowing to see this baby inside of you, moving, kicking, flapping its hands, and thinking – “I am growing this!” It was probably the first time I fully realized that I’m having a freaking baby! I also realized I shouldn’t have a Starbucks Pink Drink before an ultrasound because then baby won’t sit still.

Even though we had our 20 week ultrasound, Matt and I won’t know the gender until this Saturday when we have a small reveal get-together with some immediate friends and family. Matt and I chose to find out with everyone, but now we are regretting it seeing this little envelope with our baby’s gender sitting on the TV stand. It’s so hard not to open it! My best friend had her gender reveal last weekend and it made me so excited for ours! And I’m always feeling so excited, grateful and blessed that this baby, whatever gender, will have an amazing soul to grow up with.

I’m so excited to share baby M’s gender with you all come this weekend! Stay tuned!

Personal, Pregnancy

How to Fight Morning Sickness

If you read my previous post, you know that I had my bout of morning sickness in the first trimester for about 8 weeks – the same 8 weeks I was super ill. It was a terrible cycle – I was so nauseous I couldn’t hold down fluids (not even water) so I wasn’t helping myself get better. The violent coughing from the pneumonia made it impossible to not puke. So, as you can imagine, I tried just about every trick in the book to help combat the morning sickness. Here’s what worked for me:

Ginger Ale

Ginger ale has always been my go-to when hungover. People say it doesn’t actually help, but the ginger taste, ice cold and carbonation has always helped settle my stomach in all situations. I kept a stash at home, in my car and at work and drank it almost exclusively for weeks. The sugar intake was probably bad, but it was either that or be dehydrated which wasn’t an option for baby.

Ginger Tea

Herbal teas are tricky during pregnancy because, well, herbs are tricky. Mixed herbal teas tend to have several different herbs so you’ll find yourself googling a million herbs and their safety relative to pregnancy while standing in the tea aisle. Go for pure ginger and lemon, or ginger honey tea. Or, get a pregnancy-specific ginger tea like this organic, caffeine-free orange ginger tea from Pink Stork. As always, consult with your doctor.

Ginger Tummy Drops

There are many brands of tummy drops, but I prefer ones with a strong ginger taste (can you tell that ginger was my go-to?!) Try these Raspberry Ginger drops from Pink Stork.

Sea Bands

I’ve had major motion sickness issues my whole life, so these bands were not new to me, but I didn’t think to use them for morning sickness until they came in my first Bump Box!

Basically, they are wristbands with a metal ball that presses gently on the inside of your wrist for targeted acupressure that helps relieve nausea.

Tons of Water

This may be obvious to some, but staying overly-hydrated helps a ton. I ended up keeping a big bottle of water next to my bed and would drink as much as I could in the morning before I sat up or tried to move.

Crackers and Water on Night Stand

This wraps in with the above, but keep crackers on your night stand with your water as well. Munch on them in the morning before you start moving.

Don’t Drink While Eating

This was a tip my family doctor gave me. If you’re having trouble holding food down, eat your meal without any water or beverage, wait a while, and then drink. It helps prevent vomiting.

Bland Foods

Just like when we were kids with the stomach flu – the BRAT (bananas, rice, applesauce, toast) diet is key! I ate a lot of cheerios, plain crackers, and plain vegetable broth or ramen noodles, applesauce and toast during this phase. Anything is better than nothing. Avoid foods with strong aromas!

lifestyle, Personal

Half of my heart is in Atlanta…

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If you’ve been following along on my instagram, you probably know I recently had a brief visit to Atlanta to see my brother graduate basic training for the National Guard! Staying on an army base was a whole new world, but it was so much fun finally getting a glimpse into Mike’s life over the past several months. We were shown videos about what the new soldiers had gone through to graduate from basic, and we visited the massive infantry museum on base and learned about his potential future, as well as some of our country’s past.

It was an amazing experience and I’m so glad I got to witness him become an American Soldier. We are beyond proud of him, as I’m sure you know! After getting some much-needed quality time with Mike, he had to head back to his college, and we were left with an evening and one full day to explore Atlanta. It was my first time, so I had done some thorough research for the best spots (lots of thanks to PLIG aka Poor Little It Girl and her Atlanta Travel Guide).

One of the spots I knew I needed to check out was Ponce City Market.

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Outfit:

Identical White Beaded Tassel Earrings: Baublebar (40% off right now!)

Sheer Chiffon Smocked Off-the-Shoulder Top: $12 at F21 (40% off)!

AE High-Waisted jeans (All jeans are BOGO 50% off!)

Bracelet: Kate Spade Logo Cuff (found on Mercari and Poshmark!)

Similar brown peep-toe mule heels: ShoeMango or lulus ($35 or less!)

Ponce City Market is like a mini mall, with high-end shops like Madewell, Anthropologie and Lululemon, combined with a next-level food hall. I love shopping more than anyone, but the food hall is the highlight of the Market.

“At the heart of Ponce City Market, the Central Food Hall is becoming the most vibrant food hall and market in the Southeast. James Beard Award-winning chefs the likes of Anne Quatrano, Linton Hopkins, and Sean Brock join Atlanta’s most exciting young purveyors and restauranteurs to offer everything from Georgia and Carolinas-caught seafood, to classic burgers, cold-pressed juice, house-made pasta and freshly milled heirloom grain bread.

Similar to the legendary food hall at Chelsea Market in Manhattan—also owned by the developers of Ponce City Market—the Central Food Hall is a culinary gathering place within a revamped historic space, but with the distinct character and flavors of Atlanta.” – poncecitymarket.com

The food hall features places like Batter Cookie Dough Counter, Farm to Ladle, Root Baking Co., Spiller Park Coffee and Pancake Social. Every spot has a fresh, conscious and modern feel.

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As if PCM didn’t sound cool enough, it also features a rooftop carnival. I’m not even joking. It’s a carnival, complete with a long row of carnival games and a full mini-golf course, on a rooftop overlooking the ATL skyline.

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The rooftop is kid-friendly unless it’s on the weekend after 5:00, because then it turns into a rooftop party! But no worries, alcohol is served all day 😉

One spot I KNEW I wasn’t leaving without going to was bartaco, because I had seen them all over social media as a must-hit spot. We don’t have bartaco up north, so we drove to the northeast side of ATL to test it out. And, my goodness, was it freakin DELISH.

I ordered their classic bartaco marg, and I’m not kidding you when I say, it was the best-tasting marg I’ve ever had (and I drink a lot of margs. I’m a marg connoisseur, if you will). Everything, including the marg, is SO. FRESH.

“bartaco is inspired by the beach culture of brazil, uruguay and southern california. we are upscale street food with a coastal vibe in a relaxed environment. we are freshly-squeezed juices, specialty cocktails and beer out of a bottle. bartaco evokes a visit to a stylish beach resort and creates an unforgettable experience.” – bartaco.com

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I am all about good food, but adding a good atmosphere to that makes the food taste even better? It’s science.

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Absolutely, 100% hit them up while you’re in ATL. You will not regret it!

On my last note about food, (if you can’t tell, I’m all about food when I travel) we randomly ended up at Max’s Coal Oven Pizzeria because we saw they had gluten-free pizza. I will say this: my favorite pizza before being diagnosed with Celiac disease was Sbarro’s. I loved the thin, soft crust, the greasy cheese… Everything about it. This was the closest I’ve tasted to it since I went gluten-free. I nearly cried, it was so delicious. I am down for any pizza place that actually MAKES their crust instead of using a cardboard frozen gluten-free crust. If you’re looking for a family place downtown where you can also grab a beverage, hit up Max’s. Also, if it’s just adults, there is a kickass sports bar right next door. The easiest dinner and drinks set-up right in the heart of downtown ATL! Perfect for that first night in town when you’re settling in.

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Credit: @maxspizzaatl on instagram

I didn’t expect to have as much fun as we did with a basically 24 turnaround, but we soaked it up and I can’t wait to go back. Have you been? Drop a comment with your favorite spot in ATL!

Personal

5 Ways to be Your Own Health Advocate – And Why You Need to Be

This post is a little different, and a little personal. I’m going to share a bit of my medical struggles I’ve been facing because I feel like people truly need this advice.

I am 24 years old, and I started having severe back pain when I was 19. I was raised in a “put some dirt on it” family, so I ignored it as long as I could and let everyone tell me that I couldn’t have a serious back problem because I was only 19. “You’re so young, you don’t have arthritis.” “You’re probably just sore.” “Take some ibuprofen.”

I listened. I ignored it as much as I could. I took Aleve, Ibuprofen, I stretched, I took hot baths, whatever I could to get through the day. And that’s what I did until one day, I was riding in the car with my parents for a drive that was about an hour long. I remember sitting in the back seat and freaking out that I just “threw out” my back, and my pelvis felt detached from my lower spine. I was SOBBING. My parents didn’t know what to do, so we went to the emergency room.

This was definitely a bad idea in retrospect. I had a terrible doctor treat me in the ER, who ordered X-rays of my lower back, but before the X-rays came back, he thought it would be a grand idea to flip me over and examine my back, and without my consent, he yanked my leg up and put all his weight on my lower back to “pop it back in” because my “lower spine had popped out of place.”

I could have had a fracture or something seriously wrong on the x-ray, but he did this before seeing them. THE PAIN. Oh my god, I sobbed so hard in that ER rolling bed that I remember thinking he just broke my back, because I couldn’t breathe.

Flash forward about half an hour later, when he actually saw my x-ray results. He told me everything was fine, nothing came back from the x-rays, and prescribed a muscle relaxer and told me I was just stressed.

Obviously, I wasn’t pleased with this treatment, so as soon as I could get in, I went to my primary care physician and had the x-rays sent over to her. It was here that I found out the ER doctor who told me everything was fine, actually found degenerative changes and mild arthritis on my lower spine and didn’t bother to tell me (probably because he had just shoved my back around while telling me I was “just sore”). So here I sit, in my PCP’s office, while she sits in a chair telling me that she doesn’t understand why I’m crying, and that mild arthritis wouldn’t cause any pain like what I’m feeling. So again, she chalked it up to soreness – didn’t even get up from her chair to look at my back or examine it.

I asked her, “so what do I do for the arthritis?” She told me to take some Aleve and I would be fine. I told her I had already been taking Aleve and it wasn’t helping. She STRAIGHT UP TOLD ME that she couldn’t do anything else for me. So I asked, “well isn’t arthritis like a permanent thing? What do I do long-term?” And she tells me, “you’ll probably be taking Aleve for the rest of your life. That’s it. That’s all you can do.”

Again, obviously, I was not pleased with this appointment. But, I let her convince me that I was being dramatic. That I only had mild arthritis and I should suck it up. I was just sore. I was just stressed. Take some Aleve and get over it.

I dealt with this for a few years, along with chronic fatigue and other weird things going on. Right before my 21st birthday, I had something strange happen. I found a lymph node in my neck that was rock hard and swollen. I remember that moment so clearly. I was sitting in my mock trial coach’s constitutional law class, in the back of the room, and discovered it. I immediately felt my stomach drop because I always think the worst – so right away, I was like “oh my god, I have cancer. I have lymphoma.” I grabbed my laptop and backpack and left in the middle of class and drove straight to immediate care.

I won’t get into those details – because obviously immediate care didn’t do anything for me but tell me to see a doctor. I’ll summarize this briefly – I had an ultrasound. Wasn’t looking good. Had a CT scan. Wasn’t looking good. Had a needle biopsy to test for cancer. This test would be determinative. It wasn’t – and it wasn’t looking good. Had surgery to remove and test the node for cancer. This process went on for two months. Two months of bad news, and thinking I could very well have cancer. Two months of my now-husband being in denial. Two months of my poor mom trying to stay positive. Two months over-thinking about how my life could change, how I wouldn’t be going to law school that fall, how it was going to affect everyone around me…

Negative. The test, thank God, came back negative for lymphoma. I never in my life have felt relief like that. I ran to my car and sobbed. But…. The next day, I realized I hadn’t gotten an answer for WHY. Like, don’t get me wrong, I was SO HAPPY I didn’t have lymphoma, or Castleman’s Disease, or any other problem they tested for… But I didn’t get an answer for why this lymph node was blocked, swollen, large and rock-hard. When I contacted the specialist who did both my biopsies, he said they didn’t know.

So I moved on with life and didn’t think about it much once I was recovered from surgery. Then I found out I had Celiac Disease.

If you don’t know, Celiac Disease is an autoimmune disease where your immune system basically freaks out upon contact with gluten, and attacks the tissues of the body. Basically, the molecular makeup of gluten is so similar to certain tissues in the body, like the lining of your lower intestines, that as the body attacks the gluten as a “threat,” it accidentally attacks the lining of your organs, especially the lower intestines, thinking it too, is a threat.

As with all autoimmune diseases, when you have one, you probably have another. But, my doctors at my university’s Health Services weren’t that great, and when I went in for concerns about autoimmune issues, I got no help.

Flash forward again, and my back problems came back with a vengeance. I had multiple x-rays done. Mild arthritis. I was referred to a specialist and had an MRI done. Mild arthritis. I was sent to Physical Therapy. My back problems got worse. “You’re just sore.” “It’s just muscular.” “Mild arthritis wouldn’t be causing this pain.” “Just stretch more.” “Take ibuprofen.”

More and more of the same.

So I ignored it. I ignored my body screaming for help. I ignored my body when my hair started falling out. I ignored my body when every other joint in my body started to feel like the tin man from the Wizard of Oz before Dorothy oiled up his creaky joints. I ignored the signs of nerve damage. I ignored the headaches. I ignored my chronic fatigue that demands I sleep 10-12 hours a day to feel “normal.” I ignored the debilitating pain every time it was going to rain. I ignored everything, because I had been told so many times that I was being dramatic and that there was nothing wrong with me. I didn’t want to pay more and more money for doctors to keep telling me to take ibuprofen and deal with it. I gave up and told myself “you’re just going to have to live this way.”

Then my teeth started breaking, and I woke up one day screaming that I couldn’t use my arms, and it felt like my bones had migraines. So, I started researching. I was worried I had another autoimmune disease flying under the radar. I started learning as much as I could about autoimmune diseases that involve severe joint pain. I started learning about Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus. And then, I went to a new doctor to try again.

Only then, after I did my own research of all of my symptoms, and read multiple “feeds” of people posting about living with multiple joint autoimmune diseases – did I find a doctor who listened to me. I pulled out my sheet of notebook paper that I wrote all my medical problems and the things I suspected were wrong with me. I read it all to her, knowing full well she was probably annoyed that I was “self-diagnosing” using the internet. I did it anyway, because I needed to. And, to my surprise, she listened. She ordered tons of blood tests to see if I would set off any autoimmune indicators or rheumatoid markers.

Finally, five years later, I found out that I have some sort of connective tissue autoimmune disease. We’re not sure which kind yet, but I’m being sent to a specialist to narrow it down between RA, lupus, etc. And still, since I got those results, I’ve been doing deep, DEEP research into the depths of google, preparing to help this doctor – and myself – as much as I can.

Why did I just have you read all this?? Because I lived FIVE YEARS in pain. FIVE YEARS I went undiagnosed because I wasn’t fighting for my health. I wasn’t fighting for the answers I deserved. I was rolling over and letting doctors tell me I was dramatic and nothing was wrong with me because that’s what we’re supposed to do. We’re not supposed to google our symptoms. We’re not supposed to tell doctors what to do. We’re not supposed to tell them what tests we need. We’re not supposed to argue. They know best.

This is not at all a bashing of doctors. This is a mere recounting of the bad doctors that I’ve had, and this is massive criticism of MYSELF for not being my own health advocate. There are bad doctors out there, just like there are bad lawyers, bad police officers, bad teachers, etc. The point is, you need to be your own health advocate, because YOU, and ONLY YOU, know how you’re feeling. NO DOCTOR knows the pain you’re feeling, or the weird symptoms you’re having that you chalk up to be “nothing.” You have to help doctors for them to help you. And sometimes, you have to be stubborn.

Here are five MAJOR things you need to do to be your own health advocate:

  1. Trust Yourself

Don’t let anyone, family, doctors, friends – tell you how YOU’RE feeling. If you feel like you’re not getting answers, and you feel like something “just isn’t right” with your health – listen to yourself! I said it a few lines ago, and I’ll say it again. You and ONLY YOU know how you’re feeling. Even if you have the best doctor in the world, they can’t feel what you’re feeling in your body. Trust your instincts, and listen to your body, even when people are telling you you’re wrong.

  1. Do Your Own Research

When I say this, I am NOT talking about going online and doing a quick WebMD search and concluding you have cancer (we are all guilty of this). I am talking about DEEP in the depths of the googlesphere research. I’m talking about joining forums where people talk about health issues you think you might have. I’m talking about hours of reading multiple articles from several sources. I’m talking about reading complicated health journals written for doctors. Research, research and RESEARCH.

  1. Don’t Take No for an Answer

If you feel like you need a test done, and you’re getting a no from your doctor, or being told that it’s unnecessary, PUSH. If a doctor tells you there’s nothing wrong with you, PUSH. If you don’t feel right, and you’re getting “no, no, no” – change doctors. Get a second opinion. Post on facebook looking for recommendations on specialists. If you have a PPO, go to them. If not, demand that your PCP refer you to the specialist you want to see. Do not take no for an answer – this is your body, your life, and no one cares about it like you do.

  1. Be Involved Even When You Feel Annoying

When your busy doctor is reading you your test results, ask questions. Ask what an EO% is. Ask why you might have low blood pressure. Ask questions until you’re satisfied. They are making bank off of your appointment – don’t let them shoo you out leaving you with a million questions.

  1. Be Persistent Until You’re Satisfied

This kind of ties in with number three, but this is more of a “reach your end goal” point. For me, it took five years to get some kind of answer. Why? One, because the bad doctors I had. And two, because I wasn’t persistent enough. I gave up on myself and ignored my problems again and again until I reached another breaking point and would see a doctor again. I wasn’t persistent in reaching for answers, and I let people tell me I was dramatic and nothing was wrong with me. Be persistent, and don’t make the same mistakes as me – push and push and push until you get an end-answer that you’re satisfied with.

WOW. This is definitely my longest post to-date, and I feel so good getting this all out there. I hope this helps at least one person get closer to solving their daily health issues that they put on the back-burner. Have any of you been through a similar experience? Are you currently going through a similar experience? Comment below – I’d love to chat with you!

Tiana